Movie Review: House of Angels (1992)

The Summer of the Swedes continues.

Ladies and gentlemen… “House of Angels” (Original title: Änglagård).

When an elderly man (Per Oscarsson) passes away very suddenly, his granddaughter (Helena Bergström) and her boyfriend (Rikard Wolff) inherit and move into his old mansion. And the arrival of this somewhat bohemian couple starts stirring quite a few emotions within the village. The setup is one we’ve kind of seen before, and it’s one I have no problem with seeing, because it’s a fun setup. And while there are some enjoyable moments throughout this film’s narrative, I overall find it lackluster. Any time you see a hint of conflict to add drama, it finds a way to resolve itself before anything genuinely interesting has a chance to kick off. This makes the story feel very inconsequential. What doesn’t help it either is an ass-draggingly slow pace. I don’t mind a slow pace, as long as there’s something actually happening to add to the story (See stuff like “The Godfather”). So when you combine an inconsequential narrative with a drawn out pace, you get an experience that isn’t very fun to follow along with. Like I said before, there are a few fun moments throughout, but the overall package that is this movie’s story just feels very underwhelming.

The characters in this are all wandering cliches, with some of them handling it better than others. Helena Bergström plays Fanny (don’t laugh, it’s an actual name), a young and ambitious woman working to renovate her new home, all while trying to be friends with people in the village and still being herself. It sounds layered, but it’s not. Again, no conflict, no character development. She’s a blank, friendly slate throughout the entire thing. I’ll give her this at least, Helena Bergström is okay in the role. I am generally not a fan of her, but she did an alright job here. Then we have Rikard Wolff as Zac, Fanny’s boyfriend. He’s a man of few words, a cool as ice biker dude with a background as an artist. And while he doesn’t do too much in the story, he at least has a sense of cool that I enjoy watching. And Wolff is good in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Sven Wollter, Reine Brynolfsson, Ernst Günther, Viveka Seldahl, Per Oscarsson, Jakob Eklund, and several others, all doing quite well in their respective roles (even if their characters feel a bit hollow).

The score for the movie was composed by Björn Isfält, and it was alright. If you’ve seen other movies set in these sort of rural parts of Sweden, you have heard this sort of idyllic, old school kind of music before. It’s a certain sound that I haven’t really hard in movies from other countries, which I find interesting. Anyway, it’s an alright score that works fine for the movie.

“House of Angels” was written and directed by British expat Colin Nutley, and I think he did an alright job with it. While his direction can’t save the ass-dragging pace or underwhelming story, I do think that it still manages to give some level of watchability to proceedings by being visually pleasing and actually somewhat competent.

This movie has gotten some mixed (but mainly positive) reception. On Rotten Tomatoes it has an 80% positive rating. And on imdb.com it has a score of 6,3/10.

While other people seem to like it, I found “House of Angels” to be an uneventful slog to get through. It has a boring plot, hollow characters, good performances, fine music, and pretty good directing. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “House of Angels” is a 4,99/10. So even if there’s some good elements to it, I’d say skip it.

My review of “House of Angels” is now completed.

Summer of the Swedes is off to a rocky start…

One thought on “Movie Review: House of Angels (1992)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.