Series Review: Run – Season 1 (2020)

Love… is a burning thing, and it makes a fiery ring. Wait, Johnny Cash has nothing to do with this. Um… Love is complicated? Sure, let’s go with that. Nice save, Markus… idiot.

Ladies and gents… “Run” season 1.

Years ago, Ruby (Merritt Wever) and Billy (Domhnall Gleeson) were romantically involved, but then sort of lost touch. But not before they made a pact: If one of them text the word “RUN” to the other, and that other person texts back, they would hop on a train and run away together. And now in present day… that’s what happens. So we follow these two ex-lovers as they try to reconnect while also dealing with the personal fallout of past and present actions. “Run” is at its surface a rom-com, but does throughout also show that it has elements of a fast-paced thriller. And I thought it was a fun journey. There were several times where I didn’t see what was coming, and I enjoyed a lot of those moments. Though, the story here isn’t perfect. It often buckles under the pressure of it’s fast-pace, which can make parts of it feel a bit rushed. And without spoiling specifically what happens, I felt that the season finale was underwhelming. I get that they might want a season 2, and that they might want some bigger payoffs further down the line (if they get renewed)… but the finale here still felt like such a whimper compared to what the show felt like it was building to. Again, it’s a fine journey, and I hope that a second season could rectify that underwhelming season finale… but overall the story here is alright.

The characters in this are fun, colorful, flawed, and overall pretty interesting. Merritt Wever plays Ruby, a wife and mother and the person we meet first in this show. She’s a charming woman with some emotional baggage that creeps up at times for a bit of drama. And her arc here is mostly interesting. And Wever is great in the role. Next we have Domhnall Gleeson as Billy, Ruby’s ex-lover, and our male lead. And I won’t say what he’s like, since there’s a few details better revealed through the plot. But he also has an interesting arc that they do some fun stuff with. And Gleeson is great in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Rich Sommer, Archie Panjabi, and more, all doing well in their respective roles.

The music for the show was composed by Dickon Hinchliffe (haven’t seen his name in a while, wow). And I think he did a good job with it. His music is fun and frantic, very much befitting of the nature of this show. There’s also a few licensed songs used throughout, and they work pretty well too.

“Run” was created for HBO by Vicky Jones, with writing and directing by a whole bunch of people. And the craft here is generally good. The direction is energetic and engaging, really bringing us into the scene in interesting ways. And the cinematography, which was split between Matthew Clark and Kristin Fieldhouse, is really good, giving us a lot of fun and visually arresting shots.

This show/season has gotten some mixed reception. On Rotten Tomatoes it has an 84% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 74/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 6,4/10.

Season 1 of “Run” may be a flawed experienced, brought down by a sometimes overly frenetic pace and an underwhelming finale, but overall it’s still an enjoyable season of television that subverts rom-com cliches in some really fun ways. It has an okay plot, good characters, great performances, pretty good music, and good directing and cinematography. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for season 1 of “Run” is a 7,10/10. So while flawed, I’d still say it can be worth watching.

My review of season of “Run” is now completed.

This might be the horniest show I’ve seen in a while.

Movie Review: Texas Killing Fields (2011)

Murder is bad. Don’t do it.

Disclaimer: I know this thing is based on a true story, but I will not base my review on how perfectly accurate to the real situation it may or may not be, but I will instead judge it as a movie… which it is. Disclaimer over.

Ladies and gents… “Texas Killing Fields”.

Brian Heigh (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) and Mike Souder (Sam Worthington) are a pair of detectives investigating a series of unsolved murders in Texas. So we follow them as they try to untangle this web of who and why. So now we have our crime-drama. And is the plot here any good? The premise is actually quite intriguing, but the execution is quite average. It’s not bad, with the initial setup being good and some pretty solid moments being spread throughout, but overall it doesn’t do a whole lot to stand out from other thrillers out there. I can say though that I wasn’t ever bored… I just never found myself fully invested in the story of this movie. It’s just… fine.

The characters here are surprisingly layered and interesting. Sure, they’re not the deepest ponds in the county, but I was genuinely surprised at how interested I was in them. Jeffrey Dean Morgan plays Brian Heigh, a New York detective who had been transferred down to Texas to work with them. He’s a tough but caring man, being what you’d probably call “good cop” in an interrogation. And Morgan is great in the role. Sam Worthington plays Mike Souder, a local Texas cop who is Heigh’s partner in this investigation. He’s a bit of a short-fused asshole, and the “bad cop” of the two. And I have to say that Worthington was good in the role. The two also share some okay chemistry, not Riggs & Murtaugh levels of chemistry, but they do work pretty well together. Jessica Chastain plays another detective in this movie, though working in a different precinct, and she’s really good in the role. Chloë Grace Moretz plays a young girl named Ann. She’s neglected by her mom and she in general doesn’t seem to have a great life. But she’s pretty interesting and Moretz is really good in the role. You also get some solid supporting performances from people like Jason Clarke, Annabeth Gish, Sheryl Lee, and Stephen Graham. So yeah, this is a well acted movie.

The score was composed by Dickon Hinchliffe and I have mixed feelings about it. There are tracks in it that are very atmospheric, adding to the scenes they’re used in, perfectly fitting the setting. Then there are also tracks that feel out of place, sounding like something you’d hear in an episode of “Justified”. And while that isn’t an inherently bad thing, it just sounds a bit off in this movie. I’ll at least give the score this: It heavily features acoustic guitar, which is something I always enjoy hearing. But yeah, overall the score here is… mixed.

This movie was directed by Ami Canaan Mann, daughter of Michael Mann. And I think she did a pretty good job here. There’s a good amount of solid camera work here, and some overall neat visuals at times. There are also a couple of mediocrely directed moments, mainly stuff that is shot in the dark where you can’t see shit. But for the most part this movie is well directed. There are also like two, small-ish action scenes in the movie and they were okay, not great, not bad. Mann even man(n)ages to get some pretty good suspense out of a couple of scenes in the movie, which is something I didn’t exactly expect. So the directing here is good. Still, I’m a little bit disappointed, mainly because Danny Boyle was supposed to direct it at one point but then dropped out. Oh well, c’est la vie. Good job, Mann.

This movie hasn’t been very well received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 36% positive rating. On Metacritic it has a score of 49/100. Roger Ebert gave it 2/4 stars. And on imdb.com it has a score of 5,7/10.

While “Texas Killing Fields” isn’t a great movie, it’s still a pretty solid rainy day thriller. It has an okay plot, pretty good characters, really good performances, good music, and good directing. Flaws with the movie are that the plot is just fine, and the music being a bit off at times. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “Texas Killing Fields” is a 6,99/10. So while quite flawed, it’s still worth a rental.

My review of “Texas Killing Fields” is now completed.

Loosely based on real events.

Movie Review: Locke (2014)

OR_Locke 2014 movie Wallpaper 1280x800

Sometimes you need something quiet and subtle to help balance out all the explosions in your movie watching. Now don’t get me wrong, I like silly and fun action movies as much as the next guy, but I like a quiet drama every now and then as well. Hell, one of my favorite movies of all time, “Drive”, is for the most part a slow and methodical drama and not an action fest like most people expected. But enough of that, today we are taking a look at a slow moving drama that is set in just one location.

Sirs and madames… “Locke”.

Like I said, this movie is set in just one place, a car to be exact. And in this car we have hard-working family man Ivan Locke (Tom Hardy). Now he is driving somewhere to take care of a problem while a lot of other things come down on him at the same time. I will not spoil what his problem is as I found it more interesting finding out what it was by watching. I also loved seeing this movie unfold and just see how this man tried to handle everything around him despite the fact that it was tearing at him. The plot was really well done and definitely a breath of fresh air.

Despite the fact that the only visible character in the movie was the one of Ivan Locke, I still loved all of the characters in the movie. What I forgot to mention in the plot segment was that constantly throughout the movie he has phone conversations with a bunch of different people. And even though you could never see these people I really thought they were great characters who could be real people thanks to the superb writing and great (vocal) performances by the actors. And Tom Hardy in this movie was fantastic as usual, giving a subtle yet explosive performance. And what I mean by that is that his character was very quiet, but he had a lot on his mind which you could notice through Hardy’s facial expressions and his maneurysms, especially at times that he got big news that would change everything at times. I know my words don’t make any fucking sense, but trust me, I know what I am talking about. What I can clearly say at least is that the acting and characters are superb.

The score by Dickon Hinchliffe (Out of the Furnace) was pretty fucking great. There were a lot of ambient sounds throughout the songs that really helped highten the sense of loneliness and desperation that the movie wanted to convey. And of course there was excellent use of the guitar in the songs. To be honest, with all the guitar in the soundtrack I almost thought this score was done by Gustavo Santaolalla. But now that I know that Dickon Hinchliffe did the score the guitar still makes a lot of sense. And I fucking love it!

This movie looks fantastic, Steven Knight really shows that he is a force to be reckoned with as a director. There are a lot of beautiful shots both outside the car and inside of it. I also heard something about this movie being shot in sequence several times over and then took the different parts of each shoot and splice them together into one movie. Now if that is true or not, I am not sure, someone please tell me if it’s true or not.

This movie has been generally well-received. On Rotten Tomatoes it stands strong with a 91% positive rating and it is certified “Fresh”. On Metacritic it has a score of 81/100. And on imdb.com it stands on a 7,1/10.

“Locke” is a riveting, interesting and different movie with a terrific performance from Tom Hardy, a terrific score by Dickon Hinchliffe and some great direction/camera work. Time for my final score. Where the hell is he with that envelope? *Dials phone* Jeff, where are you? In the car? Well why aren’t you here with that god damn envelope? What? You left it here earlier? Yeah? Well, fuck you too. Sorry about that. My final score for “Locke” is a 9,76/10 and then of course gets the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”
49920178

“Locke” is now reviewed.

Did anyone seriously before this movie believe a movie about Tom Hardy driving a car for 90 minutes would be interesting? Because I didn’t.