Movie Review: Glass (2019)

What a weird franchise this is. Supernatural drama “Unbreakable” in 2000, turning out to be a superhero origin. Horror movie “Split” in 2017, turning out to be a secret sequel to “Unbreakable”. And now we get the culmination of that entire thing. What a strange and wonderful world we live in.

Ladies and gentlemen… “Glass”.

Ever since his emergence 19 years ago, David Dunn (Bruce Willis) has continued to stop bad guys as a cloaked superhero. And as he’s using his abilities to do this, he’ll run in to his old acquaintance Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson), as well as the recently emerged Kevin Wendell Crumb (James McAvoy). It’s really hard to talk about this plot without spoiling stuff, so that’s where I’m leaving it. I will however say, don’t fully expect “Unbreakable”, and don’t expect a big, climactic superhero action movie. It’s like a hybrid of the superhero breakdown stuff from “Unbreakable” and some of the psychological thriller vibes from “Split”. And for the most part I think it’s really solid, I was thoroughly entertained by the plot here and found it really interesting from a storytelling standpoint. Though the attentive reader also noticed the use of “for the most part”, and that does ring true. I really enjoyed where the plot went for most of it, but by the end I felt weirdly unsatisfied. It’s when we get to the final act and the ending. It’s entertaining and pretty well handled, but it felt just a tad off. So yeah, good plot, even if the ending leaves a bit to be desired.

The characters in this are pretty interesting and overall quite entertaining. First up we have James McAvoy as Kevin Wendell Crumb, the man with 24 personalities living in his noggin, all vying for some time in the spotlight. And like with “Split”, McAvoy has to go between these different personalities, which can be tough for many actors. But McAvoy nails it, sometimes bouncing between them faster than you can “M. Night Shyamalan”. He’s incredible in the role. Next we have Bruce Willis as David Dunn, the seemingly unbreakable (HA) man. Seeing how he’s evolved as a person since last we (fully) saw him is quite interesting, and he does have some decent character development throughout. And Willis is pretty good in the role, you can tell that he’s actually trying to act here, compared to a lot of other things he’s done recently. And we of course also have Samuel L. Jackson reprising his role as Elijah Price/Mr. Glass. It takes a while for him to get going, but when he does, he’s one of the best parts of the group of characters. And Jackson is great in the role. We also get supporting turns from people like Sarah Paulson, Anya Taylor-Joy, Spencer Treat Clark, Charlayne Woodard, Luke Kirby, and more, all doing very well in their respective roles.

As with “Split”, the score for “Glass” was composed by West Dylan Thordson, and it was great. It does emulate some of the stuff that James Newton Howard did with “Unbreakable” without making it come off as a ripoff. But it does also have a lot of horror cues, which of course are nods towards “Split”. And the finished product is an emotional, tense, and overall well done score that works very well for the movie.

As you all know by now, “Glass” was written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan, and I think he did a damn fine job on that front. You can tell that he’s gotten most of his groove back, which gives us a lot of fun details throughout that adds to the experience, whether it’s a thing in the background, or the use of colors throughout to symbolize the different characters. This is old school Shyamalan working on a somewhat more ambitious scale than his first few movies, which works quite well here. And the cinematography by Mike Gioulakis (who also worked on “Split”) is pretty damn good too.

This movie just came out, but has so far gotten quite the mixed reception. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 36% positive rating. On Metacritic it has a score of 42/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,4/10 (as of writing).

While it doesn’t stick the landing, “Glass” is still a really well done movie and a decent enough conclusion to this trilogy. It has a good plot, good characters, great performances, great music, and great directing/cinematography. As previously mentioned, the ending isn’t the most satisfying, which is what brings the score down a bit. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “Glass” is an 8,75/10. So while it is flawed, it’s still worth buying.

My review of “Glass” is now completed.

What a strange little trilogy.

Movie Review: The Machinist (2004)

Christian Bale, you crazy motherfucker. Lose weight, gain weight, skinny, muscular, skinny, fat… all that change can’t be good for the health. It’s impressive, but it also has me worried.

Ladies and gentlemen… “The Machinist”.

Trevor Reznik (Christian Bale) is an industrial worker who hasn’t been able to sleep for an entire year. And his life soon takes a disturbing turn for the worse, when he starts suspecting that someone is trying to fuck with his life. So now we have our thriller. And I thought the plot here was really good. It had a very weird, dreamlike atmosphere that I haven’t experienced many times before. And it gives the plot a decent layer of suspense. And the mystery surrounding Trevor and what’s happening to him is really layered, intriguing, engaging, and at times even disturbing.

The characters in this are layered and interesting. First and foremost we have Christian Bale as Trevor Reznik, insomniac industrial worker. He’s interesting to follow as the paranoia that surrounds him suspecting… well, everything makes him twitchy, and potentially a bit of an unreliable narrator, which I always enjoy seeing in movies. He’s deep, layered, and a fascinating character to study. And Bale is fantastic in the role. Yes, even if you look past the weight loss. And we get some supporting performances from people like Jennifer Jason Leigh, John Sharian, Michael Ironside, Aitana Sánchez-Gijón, Lawrence Gilliard Jr, Reg E. Cathey (R.I.P), and more, all doing very well in their respective roles.

The score for the movie was composed by Roque Baños, and it was great. It has an eerie, dreamlike quality to it that fits very well with the story of the movie. It also helps to just elevate a lot of the drama and suspense here. It also reminds me of “The X-Files” at a couple of points, which is never a bad thing.

The movie was directed by Brad Anderson and I think he did a great job. His direction is very tight and claustrophobic, which adds to the paranoia of the entire situation. It manages to make it feel a bit more tense and unpredictable, which never hurts in a movie like this. What also helps with this is the cinematography by Xavi Giménez, which both captures all those things I mentioned before, and overall looks fucking fantastic.

This movie has been pretty well received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 77% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 61/100. Roger Ebert gave it 3/4 stars. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,7/10.

“The Machinist” is an eerie and incredibly well made psychological thriller. It has a great plot, good characters, great performances, great music, and great directing/cinematography. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “The Machinist” is a 9,78/10. So it gets the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”.

My review of “The Machinist” is now completed.

Not a lot of movies these days where you can hear the “ominous clarinet”.

Movie Review: Jarhead (2005)

*Ron Perlman voice activated*. War… war never changes. *Ron Perlman voice deactivated*.

Disclaimer: I know this thing is based on a true story, but I will not base my review on how perfectly accurate to the real situation it may or may not be, but I will instead judge it as a movie… which it is. Disclaimer over.

Ladies and gentlemen… “Jarhead”.

Anthony Swofford is young man who recently enlisted with the United States marines. And we follow him in the time leading up to and during Operation Desert Storm, and how much damage it does to him psychologically. There’s a lot of interesting scenes throughout that does develop the story, and I was somewhat interested in everything that was going on. But I never really felt as engaged as this type of story should’ve gotten me. There was never that emotional hook that a story like this should be able to get. Now, I’m not saying it needs to make me cry, just that it needs to grab me and hold onto me really tightly… which it never really did. I remember some really well done moments throughout, but never was I fully invested in it all. Overall, a fine story.

The characters in this are all assholes… but in a believable way. I really believe that this is what one would become if going through all of that. And I find them all to be quite interesting. Jake Gyllenhaal (as previously mentioned) plays Anthony Swofford, a smart young man who goes through the ups and downs of marine life. Seeing a good guy like him tested like this is quite interesting, and it makes him a pretty compelling character. And Gyllenhaal is of course fantastic in the role. And throughout the movie we get supporting performances from people like Peter Sarsgaard, Jamie Foxx, Evan Jones, Brian Geraghty, Lucas Black, Chris Cooper, Dennis Haysbert, and more, all doing very well in their respective roles.

The score was composed by Thomas Newman, and it was pretty good. It takes some inspiration from rock and a few middle-eastern influences, all of which comes together to create an interesting atmosphere for the movie. It’s tense, fun, and just overall pretty cool. There are also a few licensed tracks used throughout the movie, all of them pleasing to the ear, and all of them working quite well in their respective scenes.

This movie was directed by Sam Mendes, and I think he did a good job. When he wanted to make me feel uneasy, he made me feel uneasy. When he wanted to build some suspense, he built some suspense. Mendes has a good eye for these things. And speaking of seeing things, the cinematography by Roger Deakins? Absolutely fantastic (what else would you expect from that man?).

This movie has gotten some slightly mixed reception. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 61% positive rating. On Metacritic it has a score of 58/100. Roger Ebert gave it 3,5/4 stars. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,0/10.

“Jarhead” has a lot of good things going for it, but it’s far from perfect. It has a good plot, good characters, great performances, really good music, and great directing/cinematography. As previously mentioned, it is brought down quite a bit by a lack of a good emotional hook in the story. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “Jarhead” is an 8,54/10. So while flawed, it’s still worth buying.

My review of “Jarhead” is now completed.

Bang a gong, get it on…

Movie Review: Prevenge (2017)

Pregnancy. Amazing, fascinating, terrifying, weird. Many words can describe this natural part of human life. But I never thought one of them would be “murderous”.

Ladies and gentlemen… “Prevenge”.

Ruth (Alice Lowe) is a widow. She’s also seven months pregnant and about to go on a killing spree. And that’s the premise for this movie. So how’s the plot here? I actually thought it was good. Weird, but good. When I say weird I don’t mean that it does anything overly ambitious and strange with the narrative, as it does follow a pretty regular structure. But what I mean by weird is that some strange shit happens throughout, and I found all of that quite interesting. The plot also has a darkly comedic tone that gives it a unique and off-kilter vibe that for the most part works. There are times where the tone somewhat clashes with moments in the narrative, but it was never enough to ruin the plot for me, it just brings it down a notch. So overall this plot is pretty good.

I’m only gonna talk about one character here since we only really follow one, and she’s the only one we really get to know. Here we have Alice Lowe as Ruth, the pregnant widow going on a killing spree. She’s a damaged and quite unstable individual that is quite interesting to follow, as she’s quite a unique and intriguing. And Rowe does a great job in the role. And all the supporting players in this are all godo in their respective roles.

The score was composed by Toydrum, and it was good. It’s an eerie electronic score with plenty of droning notes to give an ethereal and uneasy vibe that I really liked. Took scenes that would’ve been kind of bland and turned them into something unique and intriguing. It’s amazing how much music can affect something.

“Prevenge” was written and directed by its star, Alice Lowe. So she’s wrote, directed, and starred in a movie while also being pregnant? That is pretty fucking impressive. And I have to say that she did a damn good job with her directing duties here. She gives the movie a very weird, almost dreamlike feel with her directing, complementing the off-kilter story quite well. I don’t think I’ve ever watched a movie that feels like this one does, so that’s pretty cool.

This movie has gotten some mixed reception. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 94% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 71/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 5,9/10.

“Prevenge” is a weird and off-kilter character study that won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but I enjoyed it. It has a good plot, a really good character, really good performances, really good music, and great directing. Though as I previously mentioned, there are moments throughout where the tone clashes with narrative. Not a deal breaker, just brings it down a notch. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “Prevenge” is an 8,88/10. So while not perfect, I still think it’s worth buying.

My review of “Prevenge” is now completed.

Well, that was… weird.

Movie Review: Identity (2003)

Who doesn’t love a good mystery? I don’t mean in real life, because murder is fucking horrible, but I mean in movies and television shows. There’s something about murder mysteries that I just love. Even when they’re not that great and kind of formulaic (like most crime procedurals), I still enjoy watching them.

Ladies and gents… “Identity”.

It was a dark and stormy night… what, I’m not trying to be funny, it was actually dark and stormy. Anyway, a group of strangers find themselves stranded at a motel in the middle of nowhere during this weird storm. And soon they start getting killed off one by one. Basically it’s “And then there were none” in a shitty Nevada motel. But that is a formula that has proven successful in many different movies and shows, so maybe it could work here too. And while there are a lot of conveniences in this plot, it is still overall an eerie and suspenseful mystery. I found myself invested in this plot, trying to figure out who the hell was guilty. There are also a few twists in this movie that I will not spoil, but let me just say that they will polarize audiences. I for one thought they were for the most part pretty good. It’s really hard to explain why some of them worked so well without spoiling the twists, but I honestly thought that they did work pretty well. The only twist I’m a bit iffy on is the final one. It’s not awful and doesn’t detract too much from the plot, but it did feel a bit odd. But overall this is an interesting mystery that has some flaws.

The characters in this movie are pretty shallow and not the most interesting. I didn’t really hate them, but I also didn’t love any of them… they were okay. But while the characters weren’t the most compelling, the performances were great. I wouldn’t exactly call any bad, all of them were good, so I’m just gonna list some of the actors. John Cusack, Ray Liotta, John C. McGinley, Amanda Peet, John Hawkes, Clea DuVall, William Lee Scott, Jake Busey, and Alfred Molina.

The score for the movie was composed by Alan Silvestri and it was great. The stuff he composed for this movie is eerie, tense, and just overall very well composed. It really helped elevate some of the scenes throughout.

This movie was directed by James Mangold and yes, I missed that this was a Mangold movie during the “Mangoldathon” and I feel a little bit of shame over that. Still, better late than never. Anyway, I thought he did a really good job here. The shots look great and he manages to create a good amount of suspense with his direction. The biggest problem with the directing is that there’s one obvious (and kind of dumb) jumpscare in the movie, but it doesn’t bring the movie down for me. It’s quick moment, over in a second, nothing to be angry about. But overall his directing here is really good. Really, this is a damn pretty movie.

This movie has been decently well received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 62% positive rating. On Metacritic it has a score of 64/100. Roger Ebert gave it 3/4 stars. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,3/10.

“Identity” is a really interesting albeit flawed thriller. It features a good plot, okay characters, really good performances, great music, and great directing. The flaws come from some notable conveniences and the final twist being a bit odd, and the characters aren’t really the most compelling. Time for my final score. *Clears throat*. My final score for “Identity” is an 8,97/10. It’s flawed, but I’d still say that it’s worth buying.

My review of “Identity” is now completed.

I’m so happy that this movie gave me an excuse to write “It was a dark and stormy night”… always wanted to do that.

The trailer for “Legion” is here

How’s it going, guys? So Comic Con has over the past few days given us a lot of cool shit, and this is no exception. So let’s jump into it.

So we have finally gotten a traielr for “Legion”, an upcoming series from Marvel and Noah Hawley, the showrunner behind “Fargo”. So what is “Legion” about? Well it’s about David Haller (Dan Stevens), also known as Legion, a mutant who’s also the son of Charles Xavier. He’s really powerful, but he’s also kind of insane. Combine all of these factors and you’ll get something that I am super interested in. I mean, come on… it’s “X-Men”, action, psychological drama, from the creator of one of the best shows on TV. This thing will probably be fucking awesome. I know that I’m excited. While no date has been set, it is more or less confirmed to come out in early 2017.

So what do you think? Are you looking forward to “Legion”? Leave any and all answers in the comments.
Have a good one and enjoy the trailer!

Movie Review: Jacob’s Ladder (1990)

-0875b025e9bc0178

Good evening, ladies and gentlemen and welcome to the continuation of “The Month of Spooks”. Time to review another horror movie… something that is the basic plan of this little “month” of mine. Thinking about it, maybe I should start it a little earlier and plan it out a little better for next year. Anyhow, time for a horror movie… yeah.

Ladies and gents, be ready to climb… “Jacob’s Ladder”.

Jacob Singer (Tim Robbins) has an okay life working as a postman and living with his girlfriend Jezzie (Elizabeth Peña). However he is not a perfect everyday man. First off, he is in grief over his young son (Macaulay Culkin) who died and he is also beginning to have terrible flashbacks about his time in Vietnam. Also, he bgins seeing terrible and terrifying creatures and other things. So Jacob has to try to figure out what the hell is going on, why this is happening and also find a way to get out of it. And not only was the plot very well told, but it was also pretty scary. To be honest, the movie isn’t a straight-up horror movie, but it is also a drama/psychological thriller. And I do think that those aspects helps improve upon the movie. I also love the deep symbolism in the movie, it’s all really cool. Also, if a movie can mentally mess me up, that is pretty great. I guess I would say that this movie left the same type of psychological impact on me as “Enemy” did, and you guys probably know I loved that movie.

The characters are all flawed in some manner of speaking and they are all very interesting. Sure, not many of them get a lot of screen time, but that is still compensated for by great writing and excellent acting. Tim Robbins is fantastic as our broken and haunted protagonist. This is definitely one of the best performances I have seen him give. Sure, I haven’t seen too many Tim Robbins performances, but it’s still fuckin’ great. And Elizabeth Peña was great as his girlfriend. Everybody was great. No weak performances.

The score for “Jacob’s Ladder” was provided by composer Maurice Jarre. And you guys should know by now that I love Maurice Jarre. Every score I have heard from that man is somewhere between great and amazing in my opinion. And the score for this movie was not different at all, it is another welcome addition into Jarre’s discography. It is thought-provoking, it is beautiful and it is quite eerie. It really did fit the a horror movie/psychological thriller so it’s great that this movie is such a movie. Again, it’s by Maurice Jarre and I love basically everything by him.

The shots in this movie look pretty damn great. It was directed by Adrian Lyne who also made “Flashdance”. And he did a fantastic job with it. Also, he achieved some pretty fucking creepy and even scary things in the movie. One example is how he managed to create that scary “Shaking head” effect. Seriously, the way he achieved that without resorting to computers is simply amazing because that effect is some of the scariest shit I have ever seen in a movie.

This movie has been pretty well-received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 69% positive rating. On Metacritic it has a score of 62/100. Roger Ebert gave it 3,5/4 stars. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,5/10.

“Jacob’s Ladder” is a horror movie with a very deep and symbolic plot, fantastic acting, terrific music, great directing and it is actually really scary. Time for my final score. *Cough cough*. My final score for “Jacob’s Ladder” is a 9,85/10. It most definitely gets the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”.
Seal of Approval

“Jacob’s Ladder” is now reviewed.

I need more Tim Robbins in my life.

Movie Review: Oculus (2014)

tumblr_nt1wteiO311sf1xlro1_1280

BOO! Got ya there, didn’t I? No? Well, screw you. *Sigh*. Anyway, hello and welcome to a review that has been teased a bit on my twitter (Cough, shameless plug, cough) over the last two(ish) days. Mainly because I knew that this would come around these days as the introduction to something special. And by something special I mean a series of reviews that I call “The Month of Spooks”. What is that? Well you obviously didn’t read my post the other day where I first used that phrase. What I mean is that since it’s October I should review some horror movies. I already got a few suggestions by a person here on wordpress and I will maybe review those movies at some point. But if you have any horror recomendations I suggest you put them as a comment on the post “The Month of Spooks” which is relatively recent so you know what you can and can’t recommend. Anyway, rambling over, review time!

Ladies and gentlemen… “Oculus”.

In “Oculus” we follow siblings Kaylie (Karen Gillan) and Tim (Brenton Thwaites). Ten years ago something very tragic happened to them which got Tim arrested and put in psychological care. But now he gets to come out, fully rehabilitated (yay?). However, his sister drags him into a sort of investigation to prove that a mirror is evil and is the reason every terrible thing happened to them as kids. And while this shit sounds like it would make for a terrible plot, it really caught me off guard. The plot is surprisingly deep and made me doubt everything through most of the movie. It made me ask “Are these guys just out of their fucking mind or is the mirror really an evil entity?” which is actually kind of great. The plot could also get really personal and emotional at times which is not something I ever expect from a horror movie, so that was kind of cool. However I feel like it started out a little slow. But after a little while the movie kicked into high gear and I was intirgued the entire way through. So high praise to this plot.

The characters all feel like they could be very real people… real people who are stuck in a terrifying situation. And the actors did a pretty great job. Brenton Thwaites as Tim was great, playing basically a male version of Scully from “The X-Files”. Now if you haven’t seen that amazing show then first off: Go watch it! And secondly: Scully is the skeptic of the two main characters in the show, and that’s what Tim is at first. And if Tim is Scully then that makes Kaylie the movie’s version of Mulder (the believer). And Karen Gillan did a fantastic job. What caught me off guard though was how well she masked her Scottish accent and did a terrific American one, she sounded legit. Every actor was really good in the movie.

The score for “Oculus” was done by The Newton Brothers and I think it’s pretty good. It’s tension-building, it’s well-composed and it just overall fit the movie pretty damn well. It’s also very electronic in how it sounds, not that that’s bad thing. Like I said, it’s a good score that fit the movie.

This movie was directed by Mike Flanagan who I have not seen anything else from. But I can still for sure say that he did a great job directing this movie, the shots look great. Here is a fun fact: This movie is apparently based on a short film that Flanagan made in 2006, also starring the character of Tim (Sidenote: Not played by Brenton Thwaites in that one). Another fun fact: It was shot in only 24 days which is a crazy short amount of time for a movie to be made. But I guess that since it is a pretty limited film in size and scope, that makes a little bit of sense. Also, since this is a horror movie, was it scary? Yeah… it was. But it isn’t like a “BOO, MOTHERFUCKER!” type of horror movie, it instead relies on dread, suspense and disturbing imagery to scare. And it did it perfectly, getting under my skin and disturbing me to the point of leaving my room after finishing it and then hugging my dog, true story. Would I call it terrifying? No, but scary and creepy are definitely adjectives I’d like to use for it which in itself is pretty great.

This movie has gotten some pretty mixed reception. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 73% positive rating. On Metacritic it has a score of 61/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 6,5/10.

“Oculus” surprised me on every level. It has a great & emotional plot, terrific acting and characters, a really good score, great directing and as a horror movie it manaegd to scare me. Although I will subtract a little bit because it started out a little slowly. Time for my final score. *Cough*. My final score for “Oculus” is a 9,57/10. Yeah, despite the slow start of the movie, it sitll gets the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”.
Seal of Approval

Review of “Oculus” is now done.

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the scariest piece of reflective glass of them all?

Movie Review: The Shining (1980)

shining

Stephen King is an interesting author. His bibliography is such a mixed bag of genres and stories that it’s incredible. Now to be honest, the only books by King I have read are his “Dark Tower” books, so I don’t know much about his writing (Sidenote: The “Dark Tower” books are fucking amazing, go read them). I am however interested in what he has to offer. So let’s review a movie that is based on one of his books, but apparently deviates a lot from it.

Ladies and gentlemen… “The Shining”.

In “The Shining” we follow writer Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) who moves into a hotel with his wife Wendy (Shelley Duvall) and his son Danny (Danny Lloyd) over the winter to get some quiet solitude/inspiration for his writing. But things aren’t as normal as they may seem. Something is strange about this hotel, something that makes Jack lose his mind and begin both verbally and physically attack his family. And I will not say more about the plot because of how excellent it is and it is rather easy to get into spoilers. But what I can say is that the plot of the movie is very well-written, incredibly suspenseful and it messes with your mind at any point it can. The amount of twists and mind-bending plot-points really work for the movie and they all make you doubt your own sanity.

The characters in this movie are pretty interesting. Sure, they are all messed up in some way, but they are at least interesting. Let me also explain why they are all messed up. Jack lost his mind and became violent (he has also hurt his son once), Danny seems to have some strange ability and/or psychological issue. And Wendy is messed up because she is played by Shelley Duvall who looks like she was left in the washing machine for too long. I know, that was mean, but you know it’s true!

This movie uses an interesting mix of songs for it’s soundtrack. It uses both a few original tracks by Wendy Carlos & Rachel Elkind. Then we have a lot of “classic” tracks by a few composers whose names I will not write out here, go search for them. Anyway, all of the tracks used in the movie are great and really help set the creepy and often disturbing mood that the movie has.

This movie was directed by Stanley Kubrick (R.I.P) and it is gorgeous to look at. The shots are some of the best I have ever seen. Sure, “A Clockwork Orange” looked great too, but this movie is just pure eye-candy. I especially love the scenes where the camera continuously follows Danny on his little Tricycle, those scenes are just amazing to look at. They are also pretty impressive considering this movie came out in 1980. But I guess Kubrick was just ahead of his time. This is also one of the few movies that has legitimately scared me… yeah. You see, I don’t easily get scared. Mostly because I don’t consider jumpscares actual scares. I have also not really found any movie that scares me. The only really scary movie I had seen before this was “Requiem For A Dream” and that isn’t even a horror movie.

This movie has been very well-received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 92% positive rating. On Metacritic it has a score of 61/100. Roger Ebert gave the movie 4/4 stars and added it to his “Great Movies” list. And on imdb.com it has a score of 8,5/10 and is ranked #58 on the “Top 250” list.

“The Shining” is one of the few horror movies I actually have enjoyed (and gotten scared by). It has an excellent story, great performances, tense and atmospheric music and some of the most fantastic direction I have ever seen. Time for my final score.  JEFF! WHERE ARE YOU!? *Breaks door*. HEEEERE’S JOHNNY! But seriously, give me the fucking envelope so we can be done with this. Thank you. My final score for “The Shining” is a 9,88/10. IT definitely deserves the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”
Seal of Approval

“The Shining” is now reviewed.

I’m not gonna hurt you, I’m just gonna bash your brains in!

Movie Review: 1408 (2007)

1408

I’m gonna tell you the truth, I am not a big fan of horror movies. Not because I’m too scared to watch them but rather because they do not entertain me. I don’t know why I don’t like horror movies that much, I just don’t. Oh, except for “Jaws”, that movie is amazing. With that said, let’s review a horror movie.

Ladies and gentlemen… “1408”.

In “1408” we follow writer Mike Enslin (John Cusack) as he decides to travel to New York and visit the Dolphin Hotel, owned by Mr. Olin (Samuel L. Jackson), to try to tackle the mystery of the supposedly haunted room number 1408 (Roll Credits). And from that we get a plot that is pretty good. Haunted rooms/buildings is not something new in horror movies and it’s been done to death, but in “1408” it is actually done pretty damn well. The plot is held up by psychological tension and (well done) plot twists rather than overt blood & gore or the wait for the next jumpscare. And thanks to that strong focus on psychological tension I really liked the plot of the movie.

The character of Mike Enslin is a troubled man because of something that happened to him in the past. He is also a tenacious guy who really wants to understand what the deal with this room is. And John Cusack portrayes him well. He gives a strong performance that really helps hold the movie up. He goes through mindfuck after mindfuck in this movie and Cusack is so good at showing it/reacting to it.

The score by composer Gabriel Yared is tense, atmospheric, thoughtful and excellent. It helps bring the tension and thrills to a higher level than if it wouldn’t have been there. I know I am sounding stupid here, but that is what it is like to me. And I like it!

This movie is directed by Mikael Håfström who actually comes from my home country, Sweden. And I do think he does a great job with the direction of this movie. To be honest I have not seen any of his other films, not even his Oscar nominated movie “Evil” or “Ondskan” for us Swedish people. Anyway, seeing as I had not seen any of his movies before I didn’t know what to expect when it came to direction, but now I know that he is a competent director. The only slight problem in the movie is that some of the visual effects aren’t that good. But the bad ones are pretty few and don’t bring down the movie that much for me even though they annoyed me a little. Also, this is based on a Stephen King short story from his short story collection book “Everything’s Eventual” together with about 13 other stories. Now I have not read the original short story or anything else from that book, but I guess their good… I hope.

This movie was fairly well-received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 79% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 64/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 6,8/10.

“1408” is a surprisingly good horror movie, or it’s more of a psychological thriller that makes you doubt what’s real or not in the movie. It has a tense and excellent plot, a strong lead performance from John Cusack, a great original score and some terrific direction even though it also has a few not very good visual effects. Time for my final score. *Mhmm* My final score for “1408” is a 9,67/10. It does in fact get the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”
Seal of Approval

Review of “1408” is done.

Name of the sequel: “2816”.