Series Review: We Got This – Season 1 (2020)

For anyone unaware, I’m from Sweden. However, despite this, it is quite rare for me to talk about shows and movies made in my own country. But today I’m actually doing that. Yay?

Mina damer och herrar… “We Got This” season 1.

American ex-pat George (Schiaffino Musarra) has been living in Sweden for some time. However, he has recently acquired quite a huge tax debt. However, he soon finds out that there’s a 50 million SEK reward for solving the assassination of former prime minister Olof Palme. So George teams up with a colorful group of people to try to solve this nearly 40-year old case. But as they investigate, George and his team find themselves delving into a way deeper conspiracy than they probably expected. This concept is a bit on the absurd side of things, and the writing is fully aware of that, taking full advantage of said knowledge to give the storytelling a self-aware and charming tone that gives it a surprising edge over other conspiracy stories. Now, that’s not to say that “We Got This” doesn’t have any serious moments, because it does. But often it leans into a more comedic tone, almost reminding me of stuff from the Coen brothers at times. And I must say that I was thoroughly entertained by the storytelling here.

The characters in this are colorful, a bit weird, and all highly entertaining. Schiaffino Musarra plays George English, American expat trying to fix his financial situation. He’s a kind, smart, but also slightly impatient fella who’s fallen on hard times. And seeing his determination through the series to try to solve this case is quite entertaining. And Musarra is really good in the role. Next we have Alexander Karim as Alex, an old school journalist in a changing landscape. He’s also a friend of George, and the one who’s often the voice of reason (until proven wrong). He has an interesting dynamic within the show that I find quite fun. And Karim is great in the role. Next we have Olle Sarri as Björn. Björn is a bit special. He’s one tinfoil hat away from total kook, but his madness does make him and entertaining and surprisingly valuable part of the cast. And Sarri is great in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Anki Larsson, Hans Mosesson, Sandra Andreis, Christian Svensson, Johanna Wilson, Lennart Jähkel, Ida Hedlund-Stenmarck, and more, all doing really well in their respective roles.

The music for the show was composed by Goran Kajfes, and I think he did an alright job with it. It’s often a fairly jazzy affair, helping sell the lighthearted, working class absurdism of the premise. My main problem is that there aren’t really enough tracks. It makes the few in here (which generally are good) feel slightly repetitive due to some overuse. Again, the music’s pretty good… there just isn’t quite enough unique tracks.

“We Got This” was created by Schiaffino Musarra, who wrote all episodes along with Santiago Gil and Patrik Eklund, with Eklund directing all the episodes. And from that standpoint, the show is quite good too. There’s a lot of fun blocking and camera movements in the show that show how much they actually cared about the actual craft behind the show. And my god, the editing is marvelous. I did not expect to get a show with editing this snappy and energetic and fun. Reminds me a little of Edgar Wright at times. And since the show is a comedy, how’d the humor? I found it quite funny. Now, a lot of it can get lost in translation, unfortunately. But as far as I’m concerned, I laughed.

This show isn’t exactly a big, international thing, so there isn’t much review data on it on most sites I use for this section. But on imdb.com it has a score of 7,1/10.

I’ll be honest, I did not expect much from “We Got This”… but boy, am I glad I was proven wrong. It’s an absolute blast from start to finish. It has a really fun plot, great characters, great performances, pretty good music, and great directing/editing. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “We Got This” season 1 is a 9,51/10. So it most certainly gets the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”.

My review of “We Got This” is now completed.

Maybe the title was to make me feel secure with watching the show. “You want a good show? Well don’t worry, We Got This!”.

Movie Review: Sexy Beast (2001)

Despite what the title implies, this is not a porno. I know, I’m just as shocked as you are. But hey, life is weird like that sometimes.

Ladies and gents… “Sexy Beast”.

Gary Dove (Ray Winstone) is a former safecracker who has now retired to Spain with his wife (Amand Redman). However, his seemingly quiet life soon gets interrupted when volatile gangster Don Logan (Ben Kingsley) shows up to try to recruit him for another job. So now we have the setup for our British crime story… except not exactly. There is definitely a setup for a British crime/heist story, but what “Sexy Beast” does is put the job to the side for most of it, focusing on Gary trying to navigate the dangerous waters knows as Don fucking Logan. So it’s really more of a character-driven thriller rather than a typical crime story, and I really dug that. It’s fast-paced, it’s suspenseful, and it’s a lot more nuanced than one might expect from that title.

The characters are flawed, colorful, and really interesting. First up we have Ray Winstone as Gary “Gal” Dove, the former crook at the center of our story. At the start you don’t see much from him in terms of development, but as soon as ge knows Logan’s about to enter, he starts going through some interesting character stuff. And Winstone is really good in the role. Next we have Ben Kingsley as Don Logan, someone that our protagonist clearly has some history with. He’s a scary, unpredictable motherfucker that adds so much to the development of the story and characters. And Kingsley is fucking phenomenal in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Ian McShane, Amanda Redman, Cavan Kendall, James Fox, Julianne White, and more, all doing very well in their respective roles.

The score for the movie was composed by Roque Baños, and he did a good job with it. Sure, I don’t exactly remember any of it enough to hum it to you, but it worked well enough in the scenes where it could be heard. There were also a handful of licensed songs used throughout, and they worked quite well in their scenes.

“Sexy Beast” is the directorial debut of Jonathan Glazer, who I must say did a fucking great job for someone who’d never made a movie before. I admit that some of the surreal imagery used in the movie doesn’t fully click for me, but generally I liked Glazer directed. It’s energetic, it’s snappy, and it just has a way of creating a unique vibe seldom seen within the genre. And the editing is on point too.

This movie has been really well received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has an 86% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 79/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,3/10. The movie was nominated for 1 Oscar in the category of Best supporting actor (Kingsley).

“Sexy Beast” is an excellent crime-thriller that subverts the expectations one has of the genre. It has a great plot, good characters, great performances, good music, and great directing/editing. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “Sexy Beast” is a 9,62/10. Which means it gets the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”.

My review of “Sexy Beast” is now completed.

Never heard Kingsley swear this much before, holy shit.

Movie Review: Knives Out (2019)

I love mysteries. Not in real life though, that shit can be infuriating/scary. But in movies/tv/books/games, the mystery genre is one of my favorites. Who killed the man? Who stole the thing? Who pissed in the cereal? Even the worst ones can still have me entertained due to me having a soft spot for the genre. So anyway, let’s talk about a mystery movie (it’s not a mystery movie jackass, it’s right in the fucking title what movie it is). SILENCE, ME.

Ladies and gentlemen… “Knives Out”.

When famed murder mystery writer Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) dies, a private investigator (Daniel Craig) starts looking into the possibility that one of Thrombey’s eccentric relatives might’ve killed him. WHODUNIT!? The goofy spelling/grammar of that word aside, that is the genre we’re dealing with here. It’s a modern whodunit that pays tribute to the classic ones, such as “Murder She Wrote” or “Columbo”, while also putting its own fresh-feeling spin to proceedings. It gives you everything you want in a classic whodunit story, while also subverting it in some really clever ways that I honestly didn’t see coming. There’s also a surprising amount of social commentary throughout. And while I’ve watched things recently with attempts at that which were a bit too hamfisted, I felt like it worked quite well within “Knives Out”, wonderfully integrating into the already solid murder mystery.

The characters here are flawed, colorful, interesting, and buckets of fun. Daniel Craig plays Benoit Blanc, a private investigator that’s been hired to investigate Thrombey’s death. He is skilled, but he’s also a bit quirky. And holy fuck, Daniel Craig… he really hammed it up here, and it made him such a fun presence to watch. Next we have Ana De Armas as a nurse who is heavily involved in the story. And she’s great in the role. And then the rest of the cast is filled out by people like Chris Evans, Jamie Lee Curtis, the aforementioned Christopher Plummer, Don Johnson, Tony Collette, Michael Shannon, Katherine Langford, Jaeden Martell, Lakeith Stanfield, Riki Lindholme, and more… and good god damn, what a solid cast this is.

The score for the movie was composed by Nathan Johnson, and it was a lot of fun. It’s very old school in its approach, often sounding like something you’d hear in an older crime movie/show, due to its often overdramatic strings. There’s also a few licensed songs used throughout, and they work well enough. So yeah, this movie has good music.

“Knives Out” was written and directed by Rian Johnson, who I think did one hell of a job on those fronts. He gives the movie such a distinct energy that keeps it feels electric, keeping any shot or scene from ever feeling boring. That doesn’t mean any part feels rushed though, Johnson lets scenes simmer when needed… but never for too long, giving it just the perfect pacing.

This movie has so far been very well received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 96% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 82/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 8,1/10.

I loved “Knives Out”, it’s a really fun and unique whodunit. It has a great plot, great characters, great performances, good music, and great writing/directing. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “Knives out” is a 9,90/10. So that’s right, it does get the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”.

My review of “Knives Out” is completed.

Knives Out, Spoons In.

Movie Review: Evil Dead 2 (1987)

Going a bit more old school with today’s Month of Spooks entry. So here we go.

Ladies and gentlemen… “Evil Dead 2”.

After being the only survivor of an attack by a demonic force, Ash Williams (Bruce Campbell) runs into some strangers. And he has to team up with them to try to survive an absolute fucking onslaught of demons. So now we have our sequel/soft reboot. And fuck me, it’s good. Sure, the plot doesn’t do anything too major in terms of advancing storytelling techniques, but it instead presents some basic ideas and executes them in a way that is both scary and overall really entertaining. It manages to both be suspenseful horror and campy, fun popcorn entertainment.

The characters in this are colorful and entertaining. Bruce Campbell plays Ash Williams, sole survivor and overall main protagonist. He goes through a bit of a surprising arc here, which involves his psyche kinda getting broken by all the batshit insane/horrific things happening to him, and I really found myself caring for him. And Campbell is great in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Sarah Berry, Dan Hicks, Kassie Wesley DePaiva, and Ted Raimi, and they all do very well in their respective roles.

The score for the movie was composed by Joseph LoDuca, and it was good. Like the story, it kind of mixes more suspenseful pieces with more fun, slightly campy tracks, and this blend makes for an enjoyable score that fits the overall mood of the movie. Yeah. Not much else to say there.

“Evil Dead 2” was written by Sam Raimi and Scott Spiegel, with Raimi handling direction. And Raimi has such a good grasp of how to create a compelling atmosphere, right from scene one I was invested in what was going on, thanks to Raimi’s direction, which manages to create slowly seeping chills while still being highly energetic and fun. I mean, his direction is largely why the first 25-ish minutes genuinely scared me. I also have to give a lot of cred to the team that created the various effects throughout the movie, because they were fucking spectacular. Puppets, makeup, prosthetics, stop motion, liquids… it all looks great, and adds so much to the experience. What is also interesting is that there’s a decent amount of comedy throughout this movie, and that all of it is quite funny, and luckily never clashes with the more horrific elements of the movie.

This movie has been generally well received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 98% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 69/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,8/10.

“Evil Dead 2” is an absolute blast. It has a really solid plot, good characters, great performances, good music, great writing/directing, fantastic practical effects, and funny comedy. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “Evil Dead 2” is a 9,87/10. So it gets the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”.

My review of “Evil Dead 2” is now completed.

Groovy.

Movie Review: About a Boy (2002)

Having kids. Not everyone’s cup of tea. There, I said it. So many think everyone should have kids and that there’s something wrong with you if you don’t. But that’s such a narrow view of stuff. Be open to other people’s life choices. And those who don’t wanna have kids, don’t look down at those who have kids. Let’s all be friends.

Ladies and gentlemen… “About a Boy”.

Will (Hugh Grant) is an immature, cynical bachelor that has chosen single mothers as his new dating targets, and he’s willing to put up any lie to get inside their pants. This however backfires when a 12-year old boy (Nicholas Hoult) starts seeing through his lie, and becomes a central part of Will’s life. And maybe these two will learn some stuff from each other. So now we have our rom-rom/coming-of-age story. And it honestly subverted a lot of expectations I had. With these two genres, one expects a lot of tropes, and we do get a few of them here, which end up being some of the weaker elements of the story. But with that said, there’s still enough nuance and subversion here to make it an intriguing and surprisingly engaging take on these two familiar genres, while still giving you some of the heartwarming bits you’d expect.

The characters in this are flawed, layered, colorful, and overall quite interesting. Hugh Grant plays Will, the cynical man-child at the center of this story. Never one to commit himself to a single person for long, he drifts around various women like a lying asshole. He isn’t the typical charming, Hugh Grant rom-com character, and it makes him quite an intriguing and refreshing character to watch as he evolves. And Grant is great in the role. Next we have a young Nicholas Hoult as Marcus, the little kid that Will begrudgingly “befriends”. He’s a bit weird, but he’s also clever, charming, and quite an endearing kid. And Hoult is really good in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Toni Collette, Natalia Tena, Rachel Weisz, Victoria Smurfit, and more, all doing well in their respective roles.

The score was composed by the musician known as Badly Drawn Boy, and it was good. They’re basically indie pop songs, which I’d assume is the genre that Badly Drawn Boy might be associated with usually. There are even a few instrumentals that could fit that description used throughout. And this music works alright within the story. The tunes themselves are pretty good, it’s just that when used within a movie context, it creates a bit of a bland vibe. So overall… pretty good.

Based on a novel by Nick Hornby, this movie was directed by Chris Weitz and Paul Weitz, and I think they did a good job with it. There’s certainly a warmth their direction brings that makes it feel nice to watch (if that makes any sense). What really surprised me though was the shot composition. So many romantic comedies out there have what I like to call a “start the camera” look, in which it just looks like they started the camera, with no real thought of giving the movie an interesting style or any fun camerawork. But here, there’s plenty of both, this is a really well shot movie. And since it’s a comedy, we should talk about the humor… it’s funny. Some light slapstick, some surprisingly dark jokes, some clever digs at things. I laughed throughout.

This movie has been well received. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 93% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 75/100. Roger Ebert gave it 3,5/4 stars. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,1/10. The movie was nominated for 1 Oscar in the category of Best Adapted Screenplay.

While it still dips into cliches at times, “About a Boy” still subverts enough to impress. It has a good plot, good characters, great performances, good music, great directing, and funny comedy. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “About a Boy” is an 8,97/10. So while a little flawed, it’s still definitely worth buying.

My review of “About a Boy” is now completed.

Hughbert Grantchester is a lot better when he gets to do these slightly more offbeat characters.

Watch Dogs Legion E3 2019 Trailer

I promise, some day soon, I’ll stop writing E3 posts. But for now… MORE E3 BULLSHIT, WEEEEEE!

So through E3, legendary video game developer Ubisoft has revealed “Watch Dogs Legion”, which is the third game in the action franchise. The first one was about a lonely hacker seeking revenge. The second one I never played, but looks to be about some hackerific street gang. And this one is apparently about a near-future London that is under a totalitarian rule, and you have to use your hacking skills in combination with a sense of resistance to unfuck Great Britain. Two things:
1. I’m excited to see a major open world title set in a British environment for once… no reason, just fun to get away from the states or wastelands a bit.
2. Did Guy Ritchie write this fucking trailer? Because I’m getting very “Snatch”-seque vibes from it.
Either way, this looks to be interesting. I enjoyed the first “Watch Dogs”, even though I recognize that it has a fair bit of flaws. And people tell me that the sequel is even better. So who know, maybe third time’s the charm? “Watch Dogs Legion” is set to be released March 6th 2020.

What are your thoughts? Are you excited for “Watch Dogs Legion”? And fuck it… what’s your favorite Guy Ritchie movie? Leave any and all thoughts in the comments.
Have a good one and enjoy.

Movie Review: Danny the Dog (2005)

I just know that someone’s gonna see this and say “Hey wait a minute, isn’t this movie actually called Unleashed?”. And to that I say, you are not wrong. In some parts of the world, this movie is called “Unleashed”. And in others it’s “Danny the Dog”. The service I watched it on had it listed as the latter, so that’s what I’m using for this review.

Ladies and gentlemen… “Danny the Dog”.

Danny (Jet Li) is a man who has been an attack dog-like slave to a ruthless mobster (Bob Hoskins) for as long as he can remember. But when he meets a kind, blind man (Morgan Freeman), his life takes an interesting turn. Is this the greatest plot ever? No. But I do have to say that I was surprisingly invested in it. Now, I wasn’t ever deeply invested in it all, but I was invested enough to not get bored when the movie decided to slow down a bit. There are layers to the story here, giving us an interesting look at someone who’s never really felt love or compassion, only knowing abuse and violence, who finally gets a glimpse of something better. It’s a little bit ham-fisted in its storytelling at times, but overall it’s still an enjoyable tale.

The characters in this are entertaining and interesting. Firstly we have Jet Li as Danny, the titular character who’s been treated as a bit of an attack dog for most of his life. He is quite emotionally stunted, due to being a slave to a gangster for so long, so seeing him develop throughout the movie is actually pretty interesting. And Jet Li gives a pretty good performance here. Next we have Bob Hoskins as Bart, the gangster who’s been “taking care of” Danny for all these years. He’s a ruthless asshole who you kind of just want to punch in his face. And Hoskins gives a cartoonishly sneering performance here that I just loved watching. Next we have Morgan Freeman as Sam, a blind, elderly piano tuner that Danny meets, and is the first person to ever really show Danny any kind of kindness. And seeing how he affects Danny creates quite a fun dynamic between the two. And Freeman is really good in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Kerry Condon, Vincent Regan, Dylan Brown, Michael Jenn, and more, all doing well in their respective roles.

The score for the movie was composed by British trip hop band Massive Attack, and while I wouldn’t find myself listening to this music in my spare time, I do think it worked well for the movie. It is of course heavily based in the electronica/trip hop style that the group is known for while adjusting it to fit more as the score of a movie. And it helps add a little bit of fun to the movie.

The movie was written by Luc Besson and directed by Louis Leterrier, and I think that works as a fine double act. Besson’s quirks shine through pretty well, and blends wonderfully with Leterrier’s knack for creating a fast pace. The movie, even in its slower scenes, never really loses any of its energy. And seeing as this movie stars Jet Li, there’s bound to be some fight scenes in it too. And said fight scenes are fucking fantastic. Well shots, not too quickly edited, wonderfully choreographed, these fights really help add a lot to the movie.

This movie has gotten some mixed reception. On Rotten Tomatoes it has a 65% positive rating. On Metacritic it has a score of 58/100. Roger Ebert gave it 3/4 stars. And on imdb.com it has a score of 7,0/10.

While not necessarily a great movie, “Danny the Dog” is a highly entertaining action-drama. It has a pretty good plot, okay characters, really good performances, good music, and great writing/direction/fighting. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “Danny the Dog” is an 8,66/10. So while not perfect, it’s still definitely worth buying.

My review of “Danny the Dog” is now completed.

Woof woof, motherfucker.

Movie Review: Maggie’s Plan (2016)

Since it’s valentine’s day, I thought I’d watch a romance movie. So here we go.

Ladies and gentlemen… “Maggie’s Plan”.

Maggie (Greta Gerwig) has a plan to get impregnated, but without getting married, and raising the child on her own. But her plan and life gets a bit messier when she gets romantically involved with a married man (Ethan Hawke). So we follow Maggie through the ups and downs that come from this situation so now we have our romantic dramedy plot. And is it any good? For the most part, sure. It has some interesting ideas, and I was somewhat invested throughout the entirety of it. But I was also slightly bored. It was interesting enough to continue following through the entire runtime (a little over 90 minutes), but I somehow found myself a little bored by it all. It’s quite the enigma. So I guess it was… fine.

The characters in this are pretty interesting. Greta Gerwig plays Maggie, the titular lady whose plan gets a bit fucked. She’s a very kind and intelligent young woman with a lot on her mind, and it’s interesting to see her characteristics tested throughout everything that happens. And Gerwig gives a great performance. Ethan Hawke plays John, the married man that Maggie gets romantically engaged with. He’s an author and college professor with a lot on his plate. And he’s generally an interesting individual. And Hawke is great in the role. Then we have Julianne Moore as John’s wife Georgette. I’m not gonna say too much about her as she’s best experienced, but she’s quite a unique character. And Moore is really good in the role. Then we have Travis Fimmel as a guy named Guy (yes, really), and he’s the guy that Maggie more or less chose as donor for her pre-conundrum baby. And he’s a sweet guy with understandable ambitions. And Fimmel is good in the role. Then we have Bill Hader and Maya Rudolph as Tony and Felicia, two of Maggie’s closest friends. I’m lumping them both together since they kind of serve the same purpose, which is to deliver truth bombs to Maggie while also being a bit self-deprecating, which leads to a good amount of funny humor. And Hader & Rudolph and really good in the roles. It’s a well acted movie.

The score for the movie was composed by Michael Rohatyn and it was good. It’s a pretty quirky and fun score with tracks that fit pretty well within some of the quirky romantic comedy scenes. At times it isn’t a perfect fit, but for the most part it works. There’s also a whole bunch of licensed tracks used throughout, and they work pretty well in their respective scenes.

This movie was written and directed by Rebecca Miller and I think she did a good job. Her direction here is competent, even though it doesn’t do anything unique with it. It looks pretty good, but never really stands out in direction. But it’s still good enough to get the viewer (me) a bit more invested in what’s going on.

This movie has gotten some mixed reception. On Rotten Tomatoes it has an 86% positive rating and a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 76/100. And on imdb.com it has a score of 6,2/10.

“Maggie’s Plan” has a lot of good things going for it, though it has flaws. It has a fine plot, good characters, great performances, good music, and pretty good directing. As previously mentioned, the plot here is a bit of an enigma, somehow being both boring and interesting at the same time. And some of the music doesn’t quite fit perfectly. Time for my final score.  *Ahem*. My final score for “Maggie’s Plan” is a 7,77/10. So while flawed, I’d say that it’s definitely worth a rental.

My review of “Maggie’s Plan” is now completed.

Happy valentine’s day or something.

Movie Review: The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

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I will be completely honest with you guys, I am not a Wes Anderson fan. Mainly because I have barely seen anything from the guy. Before this I had only seen “The Royal Tenenbaums” and I wasn’t a big fan. But I still decided to give this a go because I had heard some great stuff about it and it looked like a pretty good movie. I also thought I maybe should check out more movies by Wes Anderson before one of you cut my throat. So here we go!

Ladies and gents… “The Grand Budapest Hotel”.

So what is this movie about? It’s about Mr. Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham) telling a young writer (Jude Law) about how he became the owner of the hotel and his adventures with the former owner Gustave H (Ralph Fiennes). The main plot around that is how Gustave is accused of stealing a painting and murdering a rich woman whom he was a good friends of. So now he has to find a way to clear his name. And from that point on the level of quirk increases to ridiculous levels and we get one of the most original and clever plots in recent years. The twists and turns this movie has really work and fit perfectly. The situations we see our heroes in are also relly fun and, again, quirky. I really enjoyed the plot of the movie.

The characters in this movie are all unique, fleshed out and highly entertaining. Which is a tiny bit surprising considering there are so many of them in this movie. But let’s start with the main ones and some favorites of mine. First off we have Gustave H. He is strict, he is weird and he is very profane and Ralph Fiennes portrayes him perfectly. He is also a very kind man. Next up is the character of Zero Moustafa (Tony Revolori) a.k.a. the young version of F. Muray Abraham. He was one of those guys you just liked because… he was a likeable guy I guess. And I do think Revolori portrayed him excellently even though it was only his first movie. Next up we have the character of Jopling (Willem Dafoe). Even though he had a very prominent role in the movie he is here mainly as a favorite of mine. He was a psychotic killer who was hired by Dmitri (Adrien Brody) who is a relative of the dead woman to check things out and maybe “Take care of things”. That’s really it. All the characters in the movie are great and really quirky.

The score by Alexandre Desplat (Godzilla, Harry Potter) is really good and once again, quirky. It really fit the often non-serious tone of the movie and also the serious bits as well because yes those exist. I don’t really know what to say, it was mostly orchestrations and they were all enjoyable… I have nothing else.

I really liked how this movie was directed. When we had the scenes with F. Murray Abraham and Jude Law we had these wide and beautiful shots. But when we had the flashbacks that focused on Ralph Fiennes and friends it was done in a smaller aspect ratio to sort of fit in the time that those parts are set in. He also used paintings as backgrounds in the flashback parts like in old movies. The only part of the direction that kinda bothered me was a part where there was a ski-chase that was really computer generated and not practical, it was really distracting for me.

This is a very well-received movie. A lot of people liked it, not just the critics. On Rotten Tomatoes the movie has a 92% positive rating with a “Fresh” certification. On Metacritic it has a score of 88/100. And on imdb.com it has an 8,1/10 and is ranked #186 on the “Top 250” list. The movie was also (at the time of this review) nominated for 9 Oscars (Holy crap). Categories: Best motion picture, Best director, Best writing directly for the screen, Best Cinematography, Best editing, Best production design, Best costume design, Best makeup/haristyling and Best original score. That is a lot of nominations!

Overall “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is a fun, quirky, entertaining movie with a good story, really good performances, a great score and great direction but is slightly brought down by that distracting computer generated skiing bit. now for my final score. LOBBY BOY! Thank you! My final score for “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is a 9,01/10. It’s a fun movie that is worth buying.
betala-kassa-butik

Review of “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is done.

I got nothing to say.