Series Review: Brotherhood – Season 2 (2003)

Last summer I covered the first season of this show. And I found it to be very good, which is something I don’t often get to say about media from my home country of Sweden. And now we’re back to cover the second season! So let’s see if this continuation is any good. Oh, and SPOILERS for the end of season 1, as that sets up this one. So yeah, let’s go.

Ladies, gentlemen, and non-binaries… “Brotherhood” season 2!

After finally having gotten arrested for robbing a bunch of banks, Jan “Hoffa” Lenhoff (Ola Rapace) gets sent off to prison. And so we follow him in his day to day life there, trying to get by while also thinking of getting out and back to his family. Right off the bat, this season is off to a good start. It’s nicely paced, the writing’s engaging, and the internal monologue of our main character really brings us nicely into the world. And as the season keeps going, the drama escalates and becomes more and more engaging… up until episode 4. Now, do not take that as the show jumping the shark at that point, because it doesn’t. The dramatic beats are still really solid. I do however feel that the pacing in episodes 4 and 5 is a bit off. What happens is that they’re working to cover A LOT of ground in just two episodes, when really it should’ve been spread out a little more, having maybe at least one more to help it from feeling so overstuffed with content. Again, the drama in itself is really strong and compelling, giving us a pretty nuanced look at these characters and their predicaments. I just wish we had another episode or two to space out the latter parts of the story a bit.

The characters in this are all pretty flawed, nuanced, and interesting. They all feel pretty believable, and they all work wonderfully within the story. Ola Rapace of course returns as Hoffa, our main guy from the first season. He was already a pretty interesting character, having an interesting arc in the first season. And in this second one he goes through another one, as his relationships get strained by his stay in prison, which makes for some compelling development. And Rapace is great in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Anja Lundqvist, Magnus Krepper, Jakob Eklund, Michalis Koutsogiannakis, Özz Nûjen, and more, all doing very well in their respective roles.

As with the first season, the music for season was handled by Martin Hansen and Mikael Nord Andersson, and they really brought their A-game here. The score of season 1 was already damn good, a moody, minimalist, blues-inspired score. And for season 2 they don’t alter the formula too much, other than adding some extra instrumentation to the various tracks, which I think really elevates it to being as great as it is.

As with season 1, the second season of “Brotherhood” was written by Lars Lundström and directed by Erik Leijonborg. And the two really did a damn fine job with it. I already talked about how solid the story and character stuff was, so I don’t think I need to mention much more about the writing. I will however say that Leijonborg’s direction remains one of my favorite aspects of the show. His style here isn’t exactly flashy or in your face, it’s very understated, almost having a bit of a fly on the wall feeling to it. And I think it works really well for the show.

This show doesn’t really exist much on my usual sites, so this section’ll be extra brief today. But I can say that it does have a score of 8.2/10 on imdb.com.

So while the pacing in the last two episodes if a little off, season 2 of “Brotherhood” is a damn good drama and further cements this as one of Sweden’s better television shows. It has a really good story, really good characters, great performances, great music, and really good directing. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for season 2 of “Brotherhood” is an 8.90/10. So while flawed, it’s definitely worth watching!

My review of “Brotherhood” season 2 is now completed.

Quality tv, woo!

Series Review: We Got This – Season 1 (2020)

For anyone unaware, I’m from Sweden. However, despite this, it is quite rare for me to talk about shows and movies made in my own country. But today I’m actually doing that. Yay?

Mina damer och herrar… “We Got This” season 1.

American ex-pat George (Schiaffino Musarra) has been living in Sweden for some time. However, he has recently acquired quite a huge tax debt. However, he soon finds out that there’s a 50 million SEK reward for solving the assassination of former prime minister Olof Palme. So George teams up with a colorful group of people to try to solve this nearly 40-year old case. But as they investigate, George and his team find themselves delving into a way deeper conspiracy than they probably expected. This concept is a bit on the absurd side of things, and the writing is fully aware of that, taking full advantage of said knowledge to give the storytelling a self-aware and charming tone that gives it a surprising edge over other conspiracy stories. Now, that’s not to say that “We Got This” doesn’t have any serious moments, because it does. But often it leans into a more comedic tone, almost reminding me of stuff from the Coen brothers at times. And I must say that I was thoroughly entertained by the storytelling here.

The characters in this are colorful, a bit weird, and all highly entertaining. Schiaffino Musarra plays George English, American expat trying to fix his financial situation. He’s a kind, smart, but also slightly impatient fella who’s fallen on hard times. And seeing his determination through the series to try to solve this case is quite entertaining. And Musarra is really good in the role. Next we have Alexander Karim as Alex, an old school journalist in a changing landscape. He’s also a friend of George, and the one who’s often the voice of reason (until proven wrong). He has an interesting dynamic within the show that I find quite fun. And Karim is great in the role. Next we have Olle Sarri as Björn. Björn is a bit special. He’s one tinfoil hat away from total kook, but his madness does make him and entertaining and surprisingly valuable part of the cast. And Sarri is great in the role. We also get supporting work from people like Anki Larsson, Hans Mosesson, Sandra Andreis, Christian Svensson, Johanna Wilson, Lennart Jähkel, Ida Hedlund-Stenmarck, and more, all doing really well in their respective roles.

The music for the show was composed by Goran Kajfes, and I think he did an alright job with it. It’s often a fairly jazzy affair, helping sell the lighthearted, working class absurdism of the premise. My main problem is that there aren’t really enough tracks. It makes the few in here (which generally are good) feel slightly repetitive due to some overuse. Again, the music’s pretty good… there just isn’t quite enough unique tracks.

“We Got This” was created by Schiaffino Musarra, who wrote all episodes along with Santiago Gil and Patrik Eklund, with Eklund directing all the episodes. And from that standpoint, the show is quite good too. There’s a lot of fun blocking and camera movements in the show that show how much they actually cared about the actual craft behind the show. And my god, the editing is marvelous. I did not expect to get a show with editing this snappy and energetic and fun. Reminds me a little of Edgar Wright at times. And since the show is a comedy, how’d the humor? I found it quite funny. Now, a lot of it can get lost in translation, unfortunately. But as far as I’m concerned, I laughed.

This show isn’t exactly a big, international thing, so there isn’t much review data on it on most sites I use for this section. But on imdb.com it has a score of 7,1/10.

I’ll be honest, I did not expect much from “We Got This”… but boy, am I glad I was proven wrong. It’s an absolute blast from start to finish. It has a really fun plot, great characters, great performances, pretty good music, and great directing/editing. Time for my final score. *Ahem*. My final score for “We Got This” season 1 is a 9,51/10. So it most certainly gets the “SEAL OF APPROVAL!”.

My review of “We Got This” is now completed.

Maybe the title was to make me feel secure with watching the show. “You want a good show? Well don’t worry, We Got This!”.

12 Films of Christmas 2018 (Final Part)

It’s time, ladies and gentlemen. The final part in this year’s 12 Days of Christmas series. It’s been fun, but it’s time for it to come to an end. So let’s go out on a note.

I was considering going with “Jingle All the Way” for this last one, as it was on tv earlier. But then I decided against it because I’d prefer to not get annoyed by a movie on christmas fucking eve. So instead I went with a different thing that was on tv, something that airs every year, same Bat-time, same Bat-channe- damn it, wrong old thing. This is “From All of Us, to All of You”. In this interesting piece of Disney animation, Mickey Mouse and Jiminy Cricket host a sort of christmas show in which they give us some “christmas cards” from various characters. These “cards” are short films, some actually christmas related, and some just clips from movies like “Cinderella” and “The Jungle Book”. And for some unknown reason, it has aired on Swedish television every year since 1960. So yeah, living here in Sweden all my life, I’m kind of familiar with this. I feel nostalgic about seeing it, but at the same time it almost gets a bit same-y, since nothing new is added. Okay, I lied, at the end they show clips from new/upcoming Disney movies, but other than that, it’s the same thing as always, with only minor edits throughout the years. That said, there’s something a bit nice and warm about it, and it brings a nice sense of joy every time I see it. “From All of Us, To All of You” is a charming little compilation with a fascinating legacy.

On the last of christmas’ days, Markus wishes your ass, happy holidays, and a merry fucking christmas.